Via
Fujifilm FinePix S4250WM
thecrimsonarcher:

A lone tree stands tall above the dense tangle of a massive laurel hell that covers the mountainside on the Fall Branch Falls trail in the Cherokee National Forest.

thecrimsonarcher:

A lone tree stands tall above the dense tangle of a massive laurel hell that covers the mountainside on the Fall Branch Falls trail in the Cherokee National Forest.

50 Years into the War on Poverty, Hardship Hits Back

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/04/21/us/50-years-into-the-war-on-poverty-hardship-hits-back.html

Submission courtesy of thekateykate

thecrimsonarcher:

Random photo for the evening—
In 1882, the Dayton Coal and Iron Company opened up a mine in the present day Laurel-Snow Pocket Wilderness Area, which covers a few hundred acres which surrounded the Richland and Morgan Creek gorges on the Walden Ridge side of the mountain. Within this area are the Richard, Nelson, and Dixon-Slope mines, which were all owned by the Dayton Coal and Iron Company. The mines were essential in mining coal to help create a fuel called coke, which was the key ingredient in making iron. The mountainside is covered in coal dust and even chunks of rock, making the trail appear black and charred at times—a testament to how plentiful that coal was in the area. The mine was mostly used during the late 1880s and 90s and as many as 450 men had worked there. The Richland Creek and Morgan Creek gorges were connected by the railroad with trains that hauled coal from the mines to the coke ovens. The finished product would be sent away to town to an old foundry that would create pig iron, which is the base for many iron products.The mines in this wilderness would not last too long, however. Accidents such as the 1895 explosion at the Nelson Mine, strikes, and low market prices were the catalyst for the Dayton Coal and Iron Company’s downfall, which finally came in the 1920s. The mines were shut down for good and the foundry used in creating pig iron was demolished. The mines were then abandoned, leaving behind the haunting and eerie ruins of the Dayton Coal and Iron Company amidst a gorgeous backdrop.
Pictured here is what’s left of the Dixon-Slope Mine. On December 20, 1895, an explosion rocked the Nelson Mine, which is right across Richland Creek from Dixon-Slope. 29 men were killed in the explosion. A rescue tunnel was built in the Dixon-Slope Mine, which eventually went underneath Richland Creek. The tunnel is now underwater and original tunnel that went further into the bowels of the earth has long collapsed.

thecrimsonarcher:

Random photo for the evening—

In 1882, the Dayton Coal and Iron Company opened up a mine in the present day Laurel-Snow Pocket Wilderness Area, which covers a few hundred acres which surrounded the Richland and Morgan Creek gorges on the Walden Ridge side of the mountain. Within this area are the Richard, Nelson, and Dixon-Slope mines, which were all owned by the Dayton Coal and Iron Company. The mines were essential in mining coal to help create a fuel called coke, which was the key ingredient in making iron. The mountainside is covered in coal dust and even chunks of rock, making the trail appear black and charred at times—a testament to how plentiful that coal was in the area. The mine was mostly used during the late 1880s and 90s and as many as 450 men had worked there. The Richland Creek and Morgan Creek gorges were connected by the railroad with trains that hauled coal from the mines to the coke ovens. The finished product would be sent away to town to an old foundry that would create pig iron, which is the base for many iron products.

The mines in this wilderness would not last too long, however. Accidents such as the 1895 explosion at the Nelson Mine, strikes, and low market prices were the catalyst for the Dayton Coal and Iron Company’s downfall, which finally came in the 1920s. The mines were shut down for good and the foundry used in creating pig iron was demolished. The mines were then abandoned, leaving behind the haunting and eerie ruins of the Dayton Coal and Iron Company amidst a gorgeous backdrop.

Pictured here is what’s left of the Dixon-Slope Mine. On December 20, 1895, an explosion rocked the Nelson Mine, which is right across Richland Creek from Dixon-Slope. 29 men were killed in the explosion. A rescue tunnel was built in the Dixon-Slope Mine, which eventually went underneath Richland Creek. The tunnel is now underwater and original tunnel that went further into the bowels of the earth has long collapsed.
Via
SONY NEX-F3
appharvestr:

dusk in a meadow

appharvestr:

dusk in a meadow

appharvestr:

misty mountains

appharvestr:

misty mountains

namastejoness:

Thousands of tired, nerve-shaken, over-civilized people are beginning to find out going to the mountains is going home; that wilderness is a necessity… 
John Muir

namastejoness:

Thousands of tired, nerve-shaken, over-civilized people are beginning to find out going to the mountains is going home; that wilderness is a necessity…
John Muir

iwritesometimes:

stack caaaaaaake. partial success: it was meant to be six layers, not four, but i grossly overestimated what a “half inch” of batter was supposed to be. (and they still baked in LESS than the time allotted? old-ass cookbooks, man. don’t believe their lies.)
i re-presented that appalachian cookbook concept for class again this year, because if my program persists in making me repeat exercises across the curriculum i see no reason not to reuse my work, and this semester i’m finally making one of the appalachian recipes i harped on about. stack cake is a traditional dense appalachian molasses cake layered with apple butter. it’s actually meant to be a LOT of very thin layers; in earlier days, appalachia, like minecraft, was 'a world where having the resources to bake cakes was a mark of considerable status,' so a single family couldn’t afford the sugar and molasses and flour necessary to make a whole cake. instead the women of several families would each make a very thin cake with what little they could put together, bring them together for a (usually church) gathering like a wedding, and then assemble all the families’ cakes into one stacked monstrosity glued together with apple butter and sheer force of mountain will.
mine’s hanging together mostly through the power of optimism.

iwritesometimes:

stack caaaaaaake. partial success: it was meant to be six layers, not four, but i grossly overestimated what a “half inch” of batter was supposed to be. (and they still baked in LESS than the time allotted? old-ass cookbooks, man. don’t believe their lies.)

i re-presented that appalachian cookbook concept for class again this year, because if my program persists in making me repeat exercises across the curriculum i see no reason not to reuse my work, and this semester i’m finally making one of the appalachian recipes i harped on about. stack cake is a traditional dense appalachian molasses cake layered with apple butter. it’s actually meant to be a LOT of very thin layers; in earlier days, appalachia, like minecraft, was 'a world where having the resources to bake cakes was a mark of considerable status,' so a single family couldn’t afford the sugar and molasses and flour necessary to make a whole cake. instead the women of several families would each make a very thin cake with what little they could put together, bring them together for a (usually church) gathering like a wedding, and then assemble all the families’ cakes into one stacked monstrosity glued together with apple butter and sheer force of mountain will.

mine’s hanging together mostly through the power of optimism.

voodoo-lady:

Blue ridge.

voodoo-lady:

Blue ridge.